The Good Girl Revolution


News & Reviews

"Hookup Ink," a review by Wendy Shalit

Hookup Ink, a review by Wendy Shalit of three books on the hookup culture on campus: .

When I critiqued the hookup culture back in 1999, and was summarily dismissed as a prude by my elders, it would have been an enormous comfort to know that less than ten years later my “prudish” position would be considered cutting-edge. But today there is little satisfaction in being buried under the avalanche of recent books like Unhooked (Riverhead, 2007) and Unhooked Generation (Hyperion, 2006),which have put the misery of postmodern sexual (non)intimacy utterly beyond dispute, and on the shelf. Even The Hookup Handbook(Pocket Books, 2005), billed as a chipper “Single Girl’s Guide to Living It Up,” can hardly be said to reflect living, much less “living it up.” 

Why Miley Cyrus is stripping down as she grows up

Read Wendy's latest op-ed in the New York Daily News. She writes: 

"Despite all the self-serving banter about her "taking the wheel" bydisrobing, the truth is that a confident, modest Miley would be farmore rebellious than a Miley who takes the usual route of pornification."

"Brilliant"--writes Marybeth Hicks, mother of four, about "The Good Girl Revolution"

In this week's column in The Washington Times, Marybeth Hicks writes that "The Good Girl Revolution brilliantly explores the cultural conundrum my daughter is experiencing. This is a book - and a movement - whose time has come."

Weekly Standard Calls Shalit's Work a "Rally Cry"

In an review essay in today's "Weekly Standard," Jennifer Marshall calls Girls Gone Mild "a rally cry for more young women to reclaim their rightful dignity and respect." Ms Marshall points to wait-until-marriage groups on campus, and Shalit's outspoken teen interviewees who have boycotted companies as "proof that the revival Shalit called for in her popular first book, A Return to Modesty, is underway."

Camille Paglia Calls Shalit-Inspired Movement "True Feminism"

In her keynote address at the "Future of Feminism" conference at Harvard on April 10, 2008, Camille Paglia had some surprising things to say about the movement for higher standards:

"Wendy Shalit’s first book, A Return to Modesty. . . created a storm when it was published nine years ago but whose influence can be detected in today’s campus chastity clubs, including here at Harvard. As a veteran of pro-sex feminism who still endorses pornography and prostitution, I say more power to all these chaste young women who are defending their individuality and defying groupthink and social convention. That is true feminism!"

Read Camille's full address

The Unreported Generational Gap

Shalit writes in the Wall Street Journal (Dec. 21, 2007):

"But by omitting all the younger, more wholesome role models from his show, Dr. Phil unwittingly revealed how much distortion is required to prop up this media-stoked controversy. The dichotomy between prudish elders and wild young'uns turns out to be, on closer examination, largely adult dogma. Yes, many young people are rebelling--but today they rebel, increasingly, by upholding high standards in the face of the low ones promoted around them."

Commentary Magazine calls Girls Gone Mild "charming, moving, sometimes heartbreaking"

Sam Schulman writes in the October issue of Commentary magazine:

In Shalit’s re-creation, the vulgar sexualization against which her heroines struggle is thus in most cases something imposed on them not so much by their peers as by adults, in an act of imperialism de haut en bas. It is the authorities who have gone wild, and the young who suffer. . .

And the good news? Shalit’s evangel is that, spontaneously, many girls are beginning to resist—rediscovering the virtues of self-assertion by rejecting the expectations of others to be “people-pleasing bad girls."

Lively Q & A with Wendy on Washington Post's Book World Live

Read the transcript of Wendy's answers on the Washington Post's Book World Live. Here's the first question:

Toronto Star Spotlight

The Toronto Star's Judy Gerstel reports on a lunch meeting with Wendy:

"An American who became a Torontonian by marriage four years ago, Shalit is the author of two thoroughly researched books about "young women reclaiming their self-respect" and rejecting promiscuity and the hypersexuality of popular culture and fashion.

Girls Gone Mild has just arrived on bookshelves. Her previous book, A Return to Modesty, was praised by Salon, The Wall Street Journal and Newsweek, which called her "a prodigy at cracking the codes of culture." Playboy, on the other hand, put it under the heading, A Man's Worst Nightmare."

AP Covers Modest Fashion Movement

Writing for the AP, Martha Waggoner quotes Wendy Shalit (Strike a pose - for virtue and modesty):

"I think what's happening is that we've reached the limit of the 'if you've got it, flaunt it,' philosophy and we're seeing the power of a little mystery and glamour," said Wendy Shalit, author of 1999's "A Return to Modesty: Discovering the Lost Virtue" and 2007's "Girls Gone Mild."

"When exhibitionism becomes the norm, the fact is, it gets boring ..."

 


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Notable and Quotable

Wendy Shalit, on why tweens shouldn't have to look "sexy":  

"There is no longer any mystery or power to sex--it is just expected that everything will be sexual, and so nothing is. There is nothing to wait for, or to look forward to."